We seek opportunities to enhance our patients’ futures

At Intercept, our mission is to translate bile acid research into promising new treatments for liver diseases.

Commitment that REVITALIZES

Rejuvenating tomorrow starts with commitment today. That’s why we’re working closely with patients and caregivers to ensure they have ample resources to navigate options.

A world of OPPORTUNITY

At Intercept, we are focused on the development and commercialization of novel therapeutics to treat progressive, non-viral liver diseases.

Commitment that REVITALIZES

Rejuvenating tomorrow starts with commitment today. That’s why we’re working closely with patients and caregivers to ensure they have ample resources to navigate options.

Alcoholic Hepatitis

Overview of AH

  • AH is a clinical syndrome of jaundice and liver failure that may occur after decades of heavy alcohol use
  • Patients with AH may eventually develop cirrhosis

Epidemiology of AH

Of the people who abuse alcohol for an extended duration, 15% to 20% will develop AH and/or cirrhosis.

  • The prevalence of AH is approximately 20% in patients with alcoholism
  • Of patients with AH, 10% to 20% may progress to cirrhosis per year
  • Up to 70% of patients with AH may ultimately develop cirrhosis
  • Up to 40% of patients with severe AH die within 6 months after disease onset

Identifying patients with AH

  • AH may be suspected in patients with an average daily alcohol consumption of over 80 g of ethanol (about 8 drinks of alcohol a day) for over 5 years
    • Duration of excessive drinking before the onset of liver disease could vary from 3 months to 36 years
  • Peak age distribution of AH is 40 to 60 years of age

Symptoms of AH

The cardinal sign of AH is the rapid onset of jaundice.

  • Patients may have encephalopathy; liver may be enlarged and tender
  • Symptoms of AH tend to include constitutional symptoms such as fatigue, anorexia, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain
  • Patients may also present with fever, ascites, and proximal muscle loss

Potential complications of AH

Complications may include, but are not limited to

  • Jaundice
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Ascites
  • Hepatic encephalopathy
  • Renal failure

Diagnosis of AH

  • Documentation of chronic and active alcohol abuse is paramount in making a diagnosis of AH
  • Liver biopsy is not essential to the diagnosis
  • In patients with ascites and a history of alcohol use, these laboratory test results may indicate AH
    • Elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with an AST to alanine aminotransferase ratio of >2
    • Total serum bilirubin level of more than 5 mg per deciliter (86 μmol per liter)
    • Elevated international normalized ratio
    • Neutrophilia

Treatment of AH

  • Currently, there are no approved treatments for AH
  • Pharmacological therapy can be used to maintain abstinence from alcohol
  • In patients with a history of alcohol abuse, it is crucial to recognize symptoms of alcohol withdrawal
  • Complications of chronic liver disease in patients who have underlying cirrhosis need to be treated
    • These include ascites, infection, variceal bleeding, altered mental status, and renal complications
  • Most US transplantation programs require 6 months of abstinence from alcohol before a patient with AH is eligible; however, due to the high mortality in this population, the patients often die during this interval

Development of obeticholic acid (OCA) for AH

  • OCA is being investigated in the US for patients who have moderately severe AH

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